MN GIS/LIS NEWS
Spring 2007
ISSUE 48

MN GIS/LIS NEWS
The Newsletter of the Minnesota GIS/LIS Consortium

Table of Contents

MN GIS/LIS Consortium

From the Chair
2007 Conference
Call for Awards
LMIC Budget

State
LMIC Update
Parcel Inventory Update
FSA Photo Update
Remote Sensing Workshop
Drought Monitoring

Governor's Council
Strategic Plan Update
Call for Commendations

Regional
MetroGIS Strategic Planning
2006 TC Metro Imagery
Property Foreclosure Info

Local
Snowmobile Trails in E911

Federal
2010 Census Address Program
LUCA Update
EarthNow!
Physical Features Map 

Higher Education
UWRF GIS/Catography
Satellite Monitoring Land/Water
GIS Day at UMD
St. Mary's Updates GIS Lab
Neighborhood Indicators
ND Online Certificate
GIS Body of Knowledge

People
McMaster to Head UCGIS

Other Places
Lawsuit May Limit GIS Industry
Disaster Management
Elevation for Nation
Food Security/Health
RI Tracks Coyotes

 

 

New Report Stresses GIS for Disaster Management
From the NRC website

The National Research Council’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources has released a new report called Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management. The report can be purchased or viewed online at http://dels.nas.edu/besr/reports.php.

In the past few years, the United States has experienced a series of disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005, which have severely taxed and in many cases overwhelmed responding agencies. In all aspects of emergency management, geospatial data and tools have the potential to help save lives, limit damage, and reduce the costs of dealing with emergencies.

Great strides have been made in the past four decades in the development of geospatial data and tools that describe locations of objects on the Earth’s surface and make it possible for anyone with access to the Internet to witness the magnitude of a disaster. However, the effectiveness of any technology is as much about the human systems in which it is embedded as about the technology itself.

This report assesses the status of the use of geospatial data, tools, and infrastructure in disaster management, and recommends ways to increase and improve their use. It explores emergency planning and response; how geospatial data and tools are currently being used in this field; the current policies that govern their use; various issues related to data accessibility and security; training; and funding. The report recommends significant investments be made in training of personnel, coordination among agencies, sharing of data and tools, planning and preparedness, and the tools themselves.