Summer 2008

The Newsletter of the Minnesota GIS/LIS Consortium

Table of Contents

MN GIS/LIS Consortium

From the Chair
2008 Conference
Silent Auction
Scholarship Winners
Call for Awards

Drive to Excellence Update
Watershed Assessment Tool

Governor's Council
National Grid Lectures
Preparedness Outreach
Call for Commendations

Parcels & Community Devel.

McLeod Co. Uses GeoMoose

Landsat Data Free
Red River LiDAR Update
USGS Flood Map
Ecoregion-Climate Reports

Higher Education
Dangermond Degree
Saint Mary's Update

ESRI & Google

Non-profit GIS User Group

GITA Conference
GITA Scholarship

Other Places
GIS Job Field



Track Flooding with New USGS Flood Map
From USGS Newsroom
An online, user-friendly map that tracks flood conditions has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). This new system is part of the USGS WaterWatch suite of web-based streamflow products and can be accessed at the WaterWatch Web site (
This real-time water monitoring is part of a continuing effort by the USGS to assist the National Weather Service (NWS) in making accurate and timely flood forecasts. During a flood, teams of USGS hydrographers travel to streamgages to keep the instruments operating and to make crucial calibration measurements of the streamflow.
Other information available from this web site for each streamgage include current flood levels, historical peaks and NWS flood forecast information. Monthly flood reports are also available that include maximum flows and compare the data to previous years that observations were made at each station.
For more than 125 years, the USGS has monitored flow in selected streams and rivers across the U.S. The USGS collects data from more than 7,400 streamgages, many of which provide real-time data in 15-minute increments. The information is routinely used for water supply and management, monitoring floods and droughts, bridge and road design, determination of flood risk, and for many recreational activities.
Access USGS information for surface and ground water from 1.5 million sites across the U.S., through the National Water Information System Web Interface (NWISWeb) by visiting